What Marco Rubio Must Do

February 13, 2016
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Based on the disappointments the huge donations have earned, many fund-raising sources are approaching the GOP primary with extra caution. Many GOP donors are sitting tight not knowing the next actions to take. Donors do not just pick a favorite and sign check to super PAC anymore. The trick now is to observe the candidate and watch his/her performance in primaries before any donation.

With many top donors finding an alternative to the much despised Trump in the Republican party, Rubio would have been that fine option. He was close to coalescing support from the elite donor class one fund raiser alluded. His performance in the race has been great so far.

With a good run in Iowa, he was getting close until his largely disappointing debate performance in New Hampshire primary and subsequent fifth-place finish in the state’s primary.

Rubio needs to pull it together in South Carolina

A major fund raiser was reported saying: “If he [Rubio] had finished second in New Hampshire or even a really close third, it would be a three-man race between Trump, Cruz and Rubio. If Rubio pulls it back together and gets on a minor roll in South Carolina, I think he can relatively quickly come back. Not because there’s such a deep loyalty to him from donors, but because they [donors] are so worried and desperately want someone to step forward to take on Trump.”

The major donors complain that the leading candidates aside Trump and their super PAC spend considerable time and money attacking one another, leaving out Donald Trump, in the run-up to the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary. The donors are now waiting until after South Carolina to jump to a real alternative.

Wisconsin roofing billionaire Diane Hendricks says he intends to wait until the cluster of primaries and caucuses on March 1 ― Super Tuesday ― before backing another candidate.

Wyoming mutual fund pioneer Foster Friess said to reporters: “I am still in the fetal position in my bed where I probably will be for the next 30 days after Rick’s decision to drop out. I want to try to play a conciliatory role. For us to win in November, all of these warring factions must kiss and make up. I have huge respect for the efforts all the candidates are extending, but only wish they would direct their attacks toward the goofy Democrat ideas rather than a circular firing squad.” Other top donors seem to share the same opinion.

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