Clinton, Sanders Democratic debate preview 3

February 12, 2016
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The issue about deportations have begun in recent weeks, and it is affecting families who were part of a multitude of tens of thousands of Central Americans, many of them minors traveling alone, who flooded across the U.S. border in the last few years. The administration said that they all have been ordered to be deported by judges. Latino leaders have condemned this action, but the Obama administration has said they are necessary to stop others in Central America from making the dangerous journey themselves.

Sanders said he believed that this message was being sent to vulnerable people who had no other choice. “When we saw children coming from these horrendous, horrendously violent areas,” Sanders said. “I thought it was a good idea to allow those children to stay in this country.” He also stated that the country should be welcoming to Latino immigrants: “We have got to stand up to the Trumps of the world, who are trying to divide us up.” Billionaire Donald Trump, who won the New Hampshire GOP primary, has said that undocumented immigrants are “rapists” and has called for a massive deportation of all the undocumented.

Clinton and Sanders agreed on the same principle but disagreed on mode of accomplishing the stated principle

Last night debate doesn’t look like a debate at all, with both Sanders and Clinton agreeing in one accord on a variety of principles. They both called for the reformation of criminal-justice, both called for universal health coverage, and they both called for a path to citizenship for the undocumented. “We are in vigorous agreement here,” Clinton stated it clearly. But they disagreed, on how to accomplish those stated goals, with Clinton saying that Sanders’ proposals were vague and un-achievable, and Sanders responded by saying anything less than his proposals was un-worthy of a great country.

Earlier, Clinton was asked about a comment from another former secretary of state – Clinton ally Madeleine Albright.

Albright had told voters in New Hampshire that “There’s a special place in hell” for women who don’t help each other. Young women who support Sanders said this was campaigning by guilt trip.

“She’s been saying that for as long as I’ve known her, for about 25 years,” Clinton stated, she now stated that she hoped men and women felt empowered to choose in this campaign. She ended with a nod to the demographics of the debate stage, where there was one female candidate and two female moderators, PBS’ Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff. “This is the first time there’s been a majority of women on the stage. So, you know, we’ll take our progress where ever we can find it.’

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