Hypotheses on antioxidants are complete nonsense

Last Updated: August 24, 2016
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Hypothesis on antioxidants and its health-promoting effects are complete nonsense, say the Danish researchers from The University of Southern Denmark. The studied the effect of bioactive substances and its effect.

Scientists from Denmark have studied the effect of antioxidants like polyphenols in blueberries and green tea, beta-carotene in carrots, and vitamin C in lemons. Earlier, the science believed that antioxidants are extremely useful for the health because of their ability to prevent harmful oxidizing the cells.

Danish research group lead by the professor Lars Porskjær Christensen has proved that such a hypothesis is nonsense. According to the conclusion of researchers, the concentration of polyphenols or other antioxidants is too low for preventing cancer.

According to professor Christensen, the traditional hypothesis on antioxidants is complete nonsense. The main reason is the concentration of polyphenols and other antioxidants in the blood — this indicator is too low to be effective.

“They say that substances shown to have an anti-oxidative effect in the laboratory, the so-called ‘direct antioxidants’, will have the same effect in the body if you consume foods that contain these substances, and that they will have a beneficial effect on our health by attacking harmful free radicals. The professor Christensen added:

“This assumption has never been proven in reality.”

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