Republican Presidential Candidates Come Together For Third Debate

Last Updated: November 2, 2015
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Ten Republican presidential candidates are gathering for the third debate this Wednesday. Economy is going to be at the center stage this time, even as new battle lines are being drawn between Donald Trump and Ben Carson, who are the front-runners at this time.

Trump has been leading the show throughout the campaign. However the last set of polls has revealed that he surprisingly trails Carson. Trump was taken by surprise, and he told voters in Iowa, “What the hell are you people doing to me”? This is the first time Ben Carson has overtaken Trump, and he hopes it stays like this to the end.

Carson, who is a retired neurosurgeon said, “People are recognizing that I’m consistent and I’m truthful and I’m one of them”.

The Colorado event on Wednesday is dubbed “Your Money, Your Vote”. It will be held at the University of Colorado Boulder. CNBC financial news network will sponsor the debate.

CNBC has said that the debate will deal with “the key issues that matter to all voters”. The presidential hopefuls are going to discuss and debate issues such as job growth, taxes, technology, retirement and health of the US economy.

Candidates Trump, Carson and Carly Fiorina will again go up against opponents with experience in public office and are likely argue that the nation’s political system has failed most Americans. Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, Mike Huckabee, John Kasich, Chris Christie and Rand Paul are likely to tout their efforts to cut taxes and promote economic growth.

There will be a preliminary session with the lower-polling candidates like the last two debates. It will feature the Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal, former New York governor George Pataki, former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum, and South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham.

Trump and Fiorina has argued that their business backgrounds will help them manage the US economy better than others.

It remains to be seen whether there is a change in the fortune of the presidential frontrunners after the Colorado debate.

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