Seaweed plays a surprisingly large role in global climate

September 13, 2016

The researchers revealed that large role, which seaweed plays in global climate. Team of marine biologists from the Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, have published the results of their research in the scientific journal Nature Geoscience

The scientists from Denmark insists that seaweed, or macroalgae, which grow on stones at the bottom of the sea, play a large role in the global climate. Earlier, that role overlooked but now the marine biology knows its important role in global climate.

A global warming caused by imbalanced carbon cycle. That means that the processes by which carbon is released, transferred, and stored are extremely important not only on the earth but under water, too.

“Our research shows that the ecosystem is not just important for ocean biodiversity, but it also plays a big role in our climate,”

says lead-author Dorte Krause-Jensen. People know very well how important rainforests are but the seaweed was underestimated in their ability to reduce CO2 from the ecosystems under water. Similar ‘forests’ in the ocean are playing the same large role under water, say Danish biologists.

Seaweed removes CO2 from the marine ecosystems

Krause-Jensen and her colleague gathered data from 105 scientific studies, where scientists have investigated everything from fresh seaweed in the stomachs of deep-sea animals, to how small stones can cross the ocean on rafts of macroalgae. The ability of the seaweed remove CO2 from the marine ecosystems is proven already.

Combining all figures and data, Krause-Jensen calculated how much CO2 is removed from the atmosphere, and the global carbon cycle, by the seaweed.