Uprising in Parliamentary Labor Party: Attempt to Overthrow Jeremy Corbyn

Last Updated: November 6, 2015
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Moderate frontbenchers are likely to organize an upsurge of resignations aiming to weaken the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, and hope to formally organize a coup intended to oust Corbyn.

Jeremy Corbyn who has been a Member of Parliament for Islington North since the general election of 1983 might now be facing opposition from several Labour frontbenchers who served under the left-wing party. Oppositions are strongly determined to remove Corbyn before the 2020 general election. Exchange of dialogues on how to remove Corbyn have been circling around the Labour frontbenchers, discussing tactics.

The first tactic is to organize a series of resignations if the Labour performs badly in Mr. Corbyn’s first major electoral test, The Independent News reports.

A Labour MP told The Independent, “There will be an uprising in the PLP [Parliamentary Labour Party] at some point, but we have to get our timing right. We may only have one shot.”

However, moderates fear that premature actions could lead to disaster. Organizing a coup is not easy without sufficient support for a change of leader. Mr. Corbyn or another left-wing dignitary might be chosen. They reasoned, “We will need to carry enough party members with us. Otherwise it would end in disaster.”

Another plot in ousting Corbyn happened on November 4 when MPs elected their chairmen, giving the moderates the opportunity to control the PLP’s 17 committees. The newly elected chairmen were labelled as “Shadow Shadow Cabinet” and “Leadership in Exile”, which include senior figures that reject Corbyn’s leadership in the Labour.

A left-wing MP defended Corbyn, saying “This is kamikaze politics from by right-wingers. People should respect Jeremy’s overwhelming mandate from party members, stop plotting and turn their fire on the Tories. If they think that plotting will help win over the members who rejected them, they are mistaken.”

Corbyn’s next actions would focus on setting up with one-to-one meetings with his backbenchers, promising to reach out to the rest of his party when he became leader in September.

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