Today: Monday, 27 May 2024 year

In Paris, protesters against pension reform occupied the building of the LVMH group.

In Paris, protesters against pension reform occupied the building of the LVMH group.

Railway workers and trade unionists protesting against pension reform occupied the building of the LVMH group (LVMH Moet Hennessy – Louis Vuitton) in Paris.

More than a hundred railway workers and trade unionists arrived Thursday at the building of the French luxury goods manufacturer LVMH (LVMH Moet Hennessy – Louis Vuitton) in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. The activists managed to get inside. There they unfurled a banner with the words “Reform in the trash, we will not give up!” and started chanting the slogan “Strike, lockdown, Macron, get out!” and burn fireworks.

On Thursday morning, the General Confederation of Labor and Solidranost trade unions held a convention of railway workers and energy workers at the Gare de Lyon, from where they headed to the LVMH office.

Last week, after the action at the Gare de Lyon, they went to the building of the largest international investment company Black Rock in Paris. The railroad managed to get inside the building, where they staged an action, chanting the slogan of the protesters against the pension reform “We are here, we are here!” into a megaphone and setting fires on fire.


In France, the 12th nationwide demonstration against raising the retirement age from 62 to 64 years is taking place on Thursday. Since January, 10 nationwide demonstrations against the reform have already taken place in France. Most of them gathered more than a million participants. The record was set on March 7, when 1.28 million participants took part in the protests, according to the Interior Ministry. At the same time, the General Confederation of Labor (CGT) counted 3.5 million members. The demonstrations were accompanied by clashes between demonstrators and the police, pogroms and riots.


French Prime Minister Elisabeth Born used article 49.3 of the constitution on March 16 to pass a bill to raise the country’s retirement age from 62 to 64 without a vote in parliament, sparking protests in the country. On April 14, the Constitutional Council of France is to make a decision on the compliance of the bill with the norms of the country’s existing legislation. If it is approved, the law will come into force on September 1.