Donald Trump will be a bad President on Obama’s opinion

August 3, 2016
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Donald Trump was sharply denounced by Barack Obama. He criticized Republicans for this choice and said their nominee unfit for the presidency.

Trump repeatedly criticized Barack Obama. He called the politician the disaster and the worst US President. Obama didn’t leave a favor unanswered and brought out his opinion about Trump’s presidency even before he became a leader of the US administration.

“The Republican nominee is unfit to serve as president,” Obama said at a White House news conference with the Prime Minister of Singapore. “He keeps on proving it.”

President’s critique was caused by several Trump’s passages. The list contains Republican’s comments about the family of the dead Muslim US soldier and his opinion about the beginning of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Trump’s lack of familiarity with international issues is one of the reasons why Obama thinks he won’t be a good governor. The other factor is the nominee’s behavior. During his meeting with the Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong Obama mentioned, that Trump’s actions created huge disputes even in his own camp. Several Republican leaders and donors turned their backs on the nominee.

Obama pointed that Trump’s actions and words cast Republican Party in a negative light. The President mentioned politicians should determine a “point” after they’ll say “that’s enough”.

Donald Trump looses financial support

Trump’s behavior made several major Republican donors not only to stop their support, but also change their political side. For example, the chief of HP Meg Whitman announced on Tuesday that she’ll vote for Hillary Clinton.

“Donald Trump’s demagoguery has undermined the fabric of our national character,” Whitman said in a statement. “America needs the kind of stable and aspirational leadership Secretary Clinton can provide.”

Clinton herself asked Whitman for her support, the businesswoman told the Times, which was the first to report the endorsement. Whitman’s comments came on a day that saw the first sitting Republican member of Congress express support for Clinton as well as the top adviser to former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and the former top aide to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

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