Don’t blame lactic acid for sore muscles

September 3, 2016

The athletes know very well what does mean the overdose of the lactic acid in the muscles. According to new research of team from the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, the lactic acid concentrations have no effect and it’s not the cause for sore muscles.

Don’t blame lactic acid for sore muscles, say the scientists from Norway. Thea professor of physiology at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences revealed that earlier known theory about a link between lactic acid and sores muscles isn’t correct. Professor Jostein Hallén explains his point of view:

“Our muscles may stiffen both at low concentrations of lactic acid and at high concentrations.We are not one hundred percent certain what causes muscles to become stiff during exercise.”

In fact, lactic acid plays a role in muscle stiffness, but the latest research showed that it more likely is due to how your body creates energy, or how your body turns what you eat into muscle power. In another word, not only lactic acid is responsible for sore muscles, it is a complex chemical reaction. Professor Hallén explains that our body has two options when the heart can no longer keep up with the body’s oxygen demands.

The first method is anaerobic metabolism, where lactic acid is produced. The second way for cells to make energy is to break down a substance called creatine phosphate, which is stored in the muscles. That’s very important for understanding the reason for physical pain, says Hallén: “Creatine phosphate is split into creatine and phosphate, but phosphate can upset the chemical balance in the cell.”