Today: Saturday, 18 May 2024 year

Bolivia’s interim president: Arrest warrant to be issued against Morales

Bolivia’s interim president: Arrest warrant to be issued against Morales

Bolivia’s interim leader Jeanine Anez confirmed that her predecessor Evo Morales would be investigated for alleged crimes of sedition and terrorism. As PressTV reports, the respective arrest warrant to be issued ‘in the coming days’.

Bolivia’s interim leader Anez attended military exercises near Bolivia’s border with Argentina on Saturday. Speaking to the local media, she threatened that ex-president Evo Morales will face arrest should he return to Bolivia from his exile in Mexico.

On Tuesday, the ex-leader gave an exclusive interview with a Miami-based American Spanish-language television network. According to Evo Morales, the US was against his return, and that while he had a right to go back to Bolivia, he wouldn’t seek the presidency if he did.

According to Mrs Anez, the arrest warrant would be issued against Morales “in the coming days.” In other words, the Bolivian borders for the former national leader are closed and he has accounts pending with the justice system. Otherwise, Morales will have to face the consequences.

“Very likely, in the coming days the arrest order will be issued because we have already filed the complaint,” Anez said, adding that Morales would be investigated for alleged crimes of sedition and terrorism.

Evo Morales: fall of the first indigenous Bolivian president

Mr Morales was the first-ever indigenous leader elected in Bolivia. He had to resign in November under pressure from the military in what he dubbed was a Washington-backed coup d’état against his Office.

Morales ruled the country since 2006, he won again Bolivian presidential race in October, but the military and opposition claimed that the election had been rigged. After the deadly street protests started, Evo Morales clearly understood that signal – opposition with the strong White House’s support has ousted him from power in a couple of weeks.

As Morales said, his forced resignation was designed to open Bolivia’s lithium reserves to exploitation by the US firms.

Afterall, then-president decided to resign and go into exile in Mexico amid threats of violence against him and with an apparent intention not to push Bolivia toward further instability.

Last week, the ex-Bolivian president travelled to Argentina, where the new leftist government of President Alberto Fernandez gave him refuge.